Coyote House

The clients' desire for a modern home with clean simple lines was the starting point for the Coyote house. While the site was flag-shaped, the actual building site was defined by an existing septic system from the former 2-story adobe style traditional house. Using these parameters, a long linear form emerged on the site slicing from the narrowest part of the site on the cul de sac back to the far corner of the 1 acre site. The entry is formed by a dramatic two-story element capped by a triangular shaped roof set at an angle to open up to approaching visitors. A low linear landscape wall pulls guests towards the front entry door bound by a curved wall that follows the arc of the door as it opens. The exterior of the building is wrapped in a soft gray and cream colored smooth-troweled plaster detailed with aluminum trim and accented with horizontal reclaimed Tiger wood to add richness and warmth to the façade. The entry façade itself is more solid with strategically placed windows to allow privacy for the homeowners. Upon entry, a dramatic contrast occurs. The back elevation of the home breaks free and consists of large planes of floor-to-ceiling glass with expansive views to the backyard. Every space on the main floor, which includes the gathering spaces as well as the master suite and a fitness room overlooking the pool, has sliding glass windows opening onto the yard to allow breezes to flow through the house.

Sierra Guest House Dusk

Sited on a South-facing slope of the Sierras at an elevation of 3,000 feet, the 1,194 sq. ft. Sierra Guest House sits in a natural clearing among deciduous and evergreen trees on its 232 acre site. The goal was to create a residence that responded directly to its environment. The building is designed as a passive-solar operable house, maximizing natural ventilation to meet our client's desire for a truly energy efficient home which would not require a standard forced air heating and cooling system. Basic thermodynamics and the natural heating and cooling of the environment are used to sculpt the form of the structure, which is a shed-form roof. Windows were placed at the highest point on the south and west elevations, and the lowest points at the opposite end of the house to take advantage of the cooler air at grade level. A portion of the building is cut into the hillside to help regulate temperatures within. A wood lattice screen on the west elevation shades the building from the afternoon sun during the summer months. Winter heating is provided by a wood stove and radiant floor heating in the slab-on-grade areas.

Sierra Guest House

Sited on a South-facing slope of the Sierras at an elevation of 3,000 feet, the 1,194 sq. ft. Sierra Guest House sits in a natural clearing among deciduous and evergreen trees on its 232 acre site. The goal was to create a residence that responded directly to its environment. The building is designed as a passive-solar operable house, maximizing natural ventilation to meet our client's desire for a truly energy efficient home which would not require a standard forced air heating and cooling system. Basic thermodynamics and the natural heating and cooling of the environment are used to sculpt the form of the structure, which is a shed-form roof. Windows were placed at the highest point on the south and west elevations, and the lowest points at the opposite end of the house to take advantage of the cooler air at grade level. A portion of the building is cut into the hillside to help regulate temperatures within. A wood lattice screen on the west elevation shades the building from the afternoon sun during the summer months. Winter heating is provided by a wood stove and radiant floor heating in the slab-on-grade areas.

Three Leaf House

Three Leaf House A vineyard set in the rolling terrain of Amador County became the inspiration for the Three Leaf House. After examining many potential locations on a 30-acre property with our client, we selected an area on a knoll with the land dropping away on two sides and a never-ending view of the Sierras unfolding beyond. Not wanting the structure to "command" the knoll, but wanting the home to capture the "postcard views", led to a series of design moves starting with the roof. We gave the roof an organic shape that grows out of the land echoing the profile of the terrain. Conceptually, the Three Leaf House maintains an orderly and rigorous module arrangement reminiscent of the surrounding vineyard's planting, while the roofs' curved form respects the rolling hills and reflects the organic nature of the vine itself. Our client's outdoor lifestyle and interest in a sustainable home were further stepping stones to the final design. Capitalizing on the surroundings and our client's willingness to create a true indoor-outdoor California house, allowed us to break the 1,500 SF Three Leaf House into 3 distinct modules each capped with an expressive roof. The central unit houses the gathering space with kitchen, living and dining. An open airy breezeway connects this space to the more private master module with a three-season screened-in terrace. The third module is separated from the central space to allow overnight guests space in their own realm. All three structures are united by shared outdoor courtyard spaces for dining, lounging, and drinking in the idyllic views of the surrounding vineyard.

Sutter Davis Hospital

Sutter Davis Hospital Dusk

The Well House

Situated on an abandoned well site, fits over 1,600 SF of living space into a 50' x 50' "left-over" parcel and takes in spectacular farm-land views. In addition to California modernist inspiration, careful attention to energy efficiency led to design features such as steel "fin" sunscreens, cantilevered decks, awnings and trellises as well as state of the art radiant floor heating. Operable clerestory windows, coupled with low operable windows on the first floor provide natural convective cooling. The project was recently featured in Sac Town Magazine for its exceptional design.

Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation

Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation Facilities Building by James Zanetto, Architect

Breezeway House

Sited on a quarter acre lot in a new subdivision, the Breezeway House is a breath of fresh air amid nondescript spec homes. Our clients desired a home that was restful and private. We designed a home that transports the residents from the restrictions of suburbanism into a realm of their own. One unusual requirement of the home was that it address the needs of an intergenerational family with a separate but attached dwelling space for a grandmother to live. We created an "H" shaped plan that provides courtyards front and back allowing lots of glass while maintaining privacy and protecting the glass from solar heat gain. In some ways, this is a modern interpretation of ancient Roman courtyard homes surrounded by activity on all sides but providing a private outdoor space of one's own.

Twin Sisters House, Fairfield, CA

Architectural masterpiece atop Twin Sisters. Panoramic view includes GG Bridge, Mt Tamalpais, Napa Valley, Mt Diablo, & the Sierras. Approx. 6,000 sf of carved slate decks. 50-ft blue-tiled pool begins inside, continues under floor-to-ceiling windows to the horizon. Gourmet kitchen has view to the other Twin Sister. Library, spacious exercise studio, & other rooms surround a glass-enclosed atrium & pond

Gallery House

The Gallery House is a 2,200 sq.ft. modern home in the suburbs of Sacramento with a playful sculptural exterior and a warm interior. One of the main elements of the design was to allow our clients to display their growing collection of art, both inside and out. The building's basic form is a gable that has been split and then slid apart to create the central spine of the home. On the interior, this spine serves as a gallery to showcase artwork. The gallery space is the divider between public and private spaces. With the limited construction budget for the project, but the Owner's desire for some dedicated art space, our goal was to eliminate the typical hallway which "eats up" square footage. While the gallery space serves as the main circulation route, it also becomes flex space enabling the dining and living areas to expand to accommodate larger gatherings. To highlight the artwork, we positioned the building on the land to capture the northern light. The roof was shaped to create an angled ceiling plane to reflect the incoming natural light down onto the lower display wall surface.